Sustainable Tulsa’s Scor3card adds business continuity!

img_20161117_100824529

img_20161117_100912387_hdr

On November 17th in the B.S. Roberts Room at OSU Tulsa, Sustainable Tulsa announced at their B2B (Business 2 Business) workshop a new and improved version of their successful Sustainable Tulsa Scor3card that was first piloted last year. It included a number of items related to resilient and sustainable business practices, including the use of low impact development. This year they have added the following item in the Healthy Work Environment category: Develop an emergency response and continuity of operations plan

Graham Brannin, David Hall and Bob Roberts worked with Tim Lovell on creating guidance for this item in the Scor3card. We want to thank Corey Williams and Matt Newman for meeting with us and discussing this important issue and to the entire Sustainable Tulsa team for allowing the Disaster Resilience Network to participate in the creation of this entry.

To find out more about the Scor3card, visit the Sustainable Tulsa website.

To see what we recommended on business resilience and the business case for doing this tied to the 2007 Ice Storm, see below:

Develop an emergency response and continuity of operations plan

Business Case

Many businesses are not prepared to respond to man-made or natural disasters. Having the proper insurance coverage in adequate amounts is only part of the solution. According to the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety, statistics show that of the businesses that close because of a disaster, at least 1 in 4 never reopens. After the December 2007 Ice Storm, a Tulsa Regional Chamber & Tulsa Partners’ sponsored survey indicated that a total of 80% of businesses reported an interruption, with the median interruption lasting 4.5 days. About 42% reported a significant negative impact from this. Businesses indicated in the same survey that existing contingency plans had a positive impact on weathering the interruption. Tim Lovell, Disaster Resilience Network (formerly Tulsa Partners, Inc.)

Tips

Inventory
• Identify critical supplies essential for staying in business or recovering quickly
• Identify critical hardware, equipment, and vehicles essential to your business
• Protect your vital records (research, blueprints, certifications, contracts, insurance policies, legal documents, historical records, etc.)
• Review back up and securing of electronic information
• Identify alternate sources of critical supplies should your supplier or vendor be unavailable
• Identify sources to replace critical hardware, equipment and vehicles in an emergency
• Consider secondary locations for records, electronic data, inventory and business operations should primary location be unavailable

Purchasing Policy
• Identify how critical financial operations such as payroll and accounts payable/receivable will continue in the event of a business interruption
• Review existing Insurance coverage annually and discuss concerns with your Insurance professional to understand your current coverage and what may be available.
• Ask your phone service and internet providers about alternatives in case of a business interruption (call forwarding, voicemail, internet access at alternate location, etc.)
• Consider setting up a contract with a disaster cleaning/restoration company in the event of a business interruption
• Ask suppliers and vendors if they have their own business continuity plans to meet your needs in the event of a business interruption
• If a larger firm, consider contracting with a business continuity and/or information technology professional for complex business functions

Create and Implement plan
• Identify the risks that are most likely to disrupt your business operations
• Identify the critical functions or activities that are essential for staying in business and recovering quickly
• Identify resources available within your business, including trained personnel (first aid, AED, Community Emergency Response Teams, ham radio operators, etc.)
• Identify resources available from external sources, including Fire Department, Police, EMS, Emergency Management
• Create emergency response plans for evacuation, shelter-in-place, lock-down
• Create an easy-to-use recovery plan tailored to specific needs
• Create a communication plan with your key customers, contacts (including personnel and their families), suppliers and vendors
• Review alternate methods of communication in the event of a loss or overloading of cell/landline service ( text messaging, password protected webpage, designated personnel carrying messages by hand)
• Regularly test your plans through simulated, full scale, or table top exercises and drills before a business interruption or disaster

Educating User
• Engage senior level executives and employees as part of the planning team as well as vendors and contractors with necessary expertise
• Provide floor warden or emergency response team training to employees
• Discuss emergency and continuity of operations procedures with incoming employees
• Develop a “safety culture” by regularly having exercises and drills on emergency response and continuity of operations procedures
• Encourage employees to develop family and individual preparedness plans

Assess Results
• Conduct exercises and drills that effectively test the plans and identify sources of strength and areas of improvement
• Conduct assessment of exercises and drills on what needs to be changed
• Review plans at least once a year

—————————
Resources

For more information on emergency response and continuity of operations planning, contact:

Disaster Resilience Network
The Disaster Resilience Network (formerly Tulsa Partners, Inc.) has a Disaster Resilient Business Council that offers annual workshops, tabletop exercises, and training. http://DisasterResilienceNetwork.org

Other Local Resources:

American Red Cross
CPR, First Aid and AED training, and presentations on emergency preparedness.
www.redcross.org

City of Tulsa
Have a plan to protect your business from flooding or other disasters! To learn more about your location’s risk of flooding and how to be prepared, call the City of Tulsa Customer Care Center at 311, or visit the City of Tulsa website.

Oklahoma Safety Council
Safety training for businesses and organizations.
http://www.oksafety.org/

Free Online Resources:
https://disastersafety.org/ibhs-business-protection/ofb-ez-business-continuity/
www.floodsmart.gov
http://www.preparemybusiness.org/
https://www.ready.gov/business
http://www.readyrating.org/

Free individual training and certification:
https://www.fema.gov/continuity-excellence-series-professional-and-master-practitioner-continuity-certificate-programs

 

Posted in About Us | Leave a comment

100 Resilient Cities Tulsa Initial Findings Report

_mg_9917Photo: Tulsa Partners Executive Director Tim Lovell with 2016 City of Tulsa Chief Resilience Officer Mary Womble Kell at one of the 100 Resilient Cities Round Table sessions. Photo by Philip Baguiao.

Tulsa Partners has been privileged to participate in the 100 Resilient Cities process. Our Executive Director served on the City of Tulsa Resilient Think Tank Team. Board members such as Graham Brannin, David M. Hall, Crystal Lovedahl Kline and Bob Roberts participated in Tulsa Resiliency Roundtable sessions and can be spotted in the online photo album. We are pleased to share the following message from 2016 City of Tulsa Chief Resilience Officer Mary Kell:

Please see the attached 100 Resilient Cities Tulsa Initial Findings Report for your review, which contains the process and summary of findings gathered this year for The City of Tulsa for this initiative.

Photos from 6 of the roundtable sessions taken by AmeriCorps VISTA Philip Baguiao can be found in this online photo album. Photos can be downloaded for free by first double-clicking on a photo and then right-clicking to save.

After December 5th, a new Chief Resilience Officer will be appointed by Mayor-Elect G.T. Bynum, and the City of Tulsa will receive the full two years of the 100 Resilient Cities grant. It has been my pleasure working in this capacity and in discovering the findings here attached. I will still be working at the City of Tulsa in Engineering Services, and you are always welcome to reach out to me with any questions.

Thanks again,
Mary E. Kell, AIA, NCARB, LEED® AP, CFM

Mary Kell will also continue to serve on our Millennium Center Steering Committee (soon to change to the Disaster Resilient Housing Council).

Posted in About Us | Leave a comment

November Key Message 2016

#NovemberKeyMessage – Have a plan to protect your business from flooding or other disasters.
new-picture-2

All businesses need to have a plan to continue operations in case of a disruption, such as in the case of a flood, ice storm, or power outage. When disasters strike, small businesses are uniquely vulnerable, and at least 25 percent of businesses that close after such events never reopen. Having a business continuity plan can make all the difference. For more information and access to numerous resources, visit the Tulsa Partners Disaster Resistant Business Council webpage or the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety .

Commercial Coverage for Flood Insurance: From 2010 to 2014, the average commercial flood claim amounted to nearly $89,000. Flood insurance is the best way to protect you from devastating financial loss. Take the first step in researching flood insurance by determining your flood risk. For information on flood insurance for your business, visit the Commercial Coverage section of the Floodsmart website.

Please note that flood insurance does not supply business interruption coverage that compensates you for your lost income due to floods. Nor will your business owner’s insurance policy, since floods are not a covered loss. Options to add business interruption coverage for flooding such as a Difference In Conditions (DIC) policy may be too expensive for a small business. Check with your insurance provider on your coverage and be sure to have a business continuity plan in place to quickly resume operations if you are in a flood-prone area.

To learn more about your risk of flooding and how to be prepared, call the City of Tulsa Customer Care Center at 311, or visit: Floodsmart or the City of Tulsa .

Tulsa Partners shares these monthly key messages from the City of Tulsa Program for Public Information as part of the National Flood Insurance Program Community Rating System. Such documented outreach assists our community in keeping low flood insurance rates in Tulsa.

Posted in About Us | Leave a comment

October 2016 Key Message: Storm Drains are for Rain!

new-picture-6 #OctoberKeyMessage With this month’s abundance of falling leaves, now is a good time to remember that STORM DRAINS ARE FOR RAIN. Pouring or disposing of anything other than storm water into a storm drain is illegal, pollutes local waterways and can cause localized flooding. Never pour or place anything into storm drains. Tulsa’s storm drains convey water to local waterways . Pouring motor oil or other chemicals down the drain can kill fish and wildlife living downstream. Putting leaves, grass clippings or other waste down drains clogs storm drains and requires the city to spend more money to clean them out – which is an added expense to taxpayers. If leaves or debris are blocking a storm drain or if you witness illegal dumping, please call the City of Tulsa Customer Care Center: (918) 596-2100 to report it, because it can be dangerous and damaging. Let’s keep our local waterways clean and free flowing. For more information, go to City of Tulsa Stormwater Quality.

Tulsa Partners shares these monthly key messages from the City of Tulsa Program for Public Information as part of the National Flood Insurance Program Community Rating System. Such documented outreach assists our community in keeping low flood insurance rates in Tulsa.

Posted in About Us | Leave a comment

An Important Message from the Disaster Resistant Business Council

Graphics retrieved from IBHS' PowerPoint presentation at Tulsa Partners' Make a Plan Workshop in 2013.

Graphics retrieved from IBHS’ PowerPoint presentation at Tulsa Partners’ Make a Plan Workshop in 2013.


“Have a plan to protect your business from flooding or other disasters.”

This is what we share as a one of the key messages from the City of Tulsa Program for Public Information. And we usually tell people to check their insurance coverage, especially their business interruption insurance. But what if that business interruption insurance does not apply when you flood?

Dave Hall, Chair of the Disaster Resistant Business Council (DRBC) and Vice President of the Board of Directors for Tulsa Partners, was recently doing research on business disaster losses and business interruption insurance, particularly small businesses. For those who may not know, business interruption insurance covers the loss of income that a business suffers after a disaster. He discovered something that led to discussion by the DRBC, the City of Tulsa Program for Public Information Committee, and other partners.

What did Dave find out?

New Orleans, Louisiana 2005. Graphics retrieved from NOAA Photo Library, National Weather Service Collection, Lieut. Commander Mike Moran, NOAA Corps, NMAO/AOC.

New Orleans, Louisiana 2005. Graphics retrieved from NOAA Photo Library, National Weather Service Collection, Lieut. Commander Mike Moran, NOAA Corps, NMAO/AOC.

1. Business Interruption is included with your Business Owners Policy as a Contingent coverage (there must be a covered loss for this coverage to apply);

2. Floods are excluded as a covered loss;

3. FEMA offers Flood policies through the National Flood Insurance Program; BUT

4. Flood policies exclude Business Interruption.

So, even if you have flood insurance, you do not have business interruption insurance either through your Business Owners Policy or your flood insurance policy.

The only insurance option available to fill this hole in coverage is something called a Difference In Condition policy, which is not offered as part of, or in addition to, the standard Business Owners Policy. As a non-standard policy, it is written and priced differently by various companies. Since this is coverage that insurance companies either don’t provide, or specifically exclude due to risk, it is typically an expensive option, and probably out of reach of many small businesses.

What to do?

First, do you own due diligence by checking with your insurance provider about your Business Owners coverage. If your small business is in a flood-prone area and you are unable to get business interruption coverage, it is even more important that you take proactive measures to ensure that your business operations continue after a flood.

ibhs-ofb-ez-logoOne resource that we recommend to assist with your business continuity planning is the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety’s Open for Business-EZ Toolkit. You will find a variety of tools and information at this webpage.

Stay with us in the coming months as we look at this important topic. In our October newsletter we will have information on business continuity workshops we are doing in Louisiana with the Lowlander Center and WaterWorks LA, as well as a questionnaire to help us offer you future workshops that meet your needs. Our monthly key message in November will go into more detail about the need to have a plan to protect your business.

To learn more about Tulsa Partners’ Disaster Resistant Business Council, click here.

Posted in About Us, Disaster Resistant Business Council | Leave a comment

Build Resilient! Living with High Wind, Hail, Earthquake and Flood

Steve Nave is evaluating the roof for an Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety FORTIFIED Home High Wind and Hail Bronze designation. This was at the August 2016 24-hour build in the Kendall Whittier neighborhood for Tulsa Habitat for Humanity by the Home Builders Association of Greater Tulsa and the HBA Charitable Foundation. 

Steve Nave is evaluating the roof for an Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety FORTIFIED Home High Wind and Hail Bronze designation. This was at the August 2016 24-hour build in the Kendall Whittier neighborhood for Tulsa Habitat for Humanity by the Home Builders Association of Greater Tulsa and the HBA Charitable Foundation. 


IBHS FORTIFIED HOME
These are exciting times for the IBHS FORTIFIED Home High Wind / High Wind and Hail certification program. Since our launch at the National Tornado Summit in March, we have had over 60 people from various companies and professions participate in FORTIFIED Wise, FORTIFIED Evaluator, and the recently-piloted FORTIFIED Roofer training here in Oklahoma. We had one Tulsa Habitat for Humanity home which is pending certification for a Bronze level High Wind and Hail designation, another privately-constructed home in Sand Springs being built by J. Madden Construction to the Gold level High Wind and Hail designation, and a third home being built to the Gold level High Wind and Hail designation by Tulsa Habitat for Humanity–with support from Tulsa Partners and State Farm. Special thanks to our partners at Huber Engineered Woods (Zip System), Malarkey Roofing, and Simpson Strong-Tie for their support of this initiative. For more on the FORTIFIED Home program go to the Insurance Institute for Business and Home Safety ( IBHS).

EARTHQUAKE!
intensityThe start of the FORTIFIED Home program in Oklahoma coincided six months ago with the EF2 Tornado in north Tulsa. Today, though, many people are focused on a different hazard. On September 3rd, Oklahoma experienced it’s strongest earthquake ever recorded at a magnitude 5.8 centered in Pawnee, Oklahoma. The previous record in Prague, Oklahoma in 2011 was upgraded from a magnitude 5.6 to 5.7. This has led people to ask if  the IBHS FORTIFIED Home program can protect against earthquake. Although the continuous load path (attaching roof to wall, wall to floor, floor to foundation) offered through the FORTIFIED Gold level could provide some resilience with earthquakes, IBHS does not identify nor certify FORTIFIED as an earthquake mitigation program. For more information on the Pawnee and Prague earthquake measurements, visit this link. For more on what to do before, during or after a earthquake, go to the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes (FLASH).

DO YOU KNOW YOUR RISK OF FLOODING?
In our October newsletter, we will be providing extensive coverage of the anniversary commemoration of the 1986 Arkansas River Flood. Here, though, is an important preview. If you live in Tulsa County, you need to check out this story. Congratulations to KOTV – The News On 6, Travis Meyer and Mike Grogan on a well documented, easy-to-understand story about our risk of flooding along the Arkansas River. Be sure to also look at the Web Extra flood fly over showing what would be flooded in 100 year, 200 year and 500 year flood events.

NewsOn6.com – Tulsa, OK – News, Weather, Video and Sports – KOTV.com |

NewsOn6.com – Tulsa, OK – News, Weather, Video and Sports – KOTV.com |

Posted in About Us | Leave a comment

LCB and OKMRC: Two positive outgrowths of the response to the September 11, 2001 Attack

Carrie Suns with the Oklahoma Medical Reserve Corps and Tina Peña​ with Tulsa Partners Language & Culture Bank volunteering at a booth at the August 2016 Tulsa Culture Festival.

Carrie Suns with the Oklahoma Medical Reserve Corps and Tina Peña​ with Tulsa Partners Language & Culture Bank volunteering at a booth at the August 2016 Tulsa Culture Festival.

Fifteen years ago, our nation was looking for ways to respond and serve after September 11th. Two outstanding programs that grew out of that era and have ties to Tulsa Partners are the Oklahoma Medical Reserve Corps and the Language & Culture Bank. 

MRC-vector-logoTulsa Partners received a three-year grant in September 2002 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Office of the Surgeon General to develop the Medical Reserve Corps in Tulsa. The intent was to later to expand the program to Oklahoma City. The highly-successful Oklahoma Medical Reserve Corps (OKMRC) is now administered by the Oklahoma State Department of Health  The OKMRC provides ongoing training and credentialing of volunteers in medical and non-medical roles in disaster. It  has an amazing 5,459 volunteers, 903 of which are in Tulsa. The OKMRC currently participates in our Language & Culture Bank steering committee along with the Tulsa Health Department.

prepareathonThe Language & Culture Bank was one of the local Citizen Corps programs developed with federal grant funding in response to September 11th. Originally created to provide multi-cultural, multi-lingual citizen volunteers, this grassroots coalition now works with diverse communities on emergency preparedness and to make sure everyone receives emergency communications in a form they can understand. In the past year, for example,  it has worked with the Spanish language media on a series of America’s PrepareAthon events to help the media understand the need for preparedness and their role in sharing that message. Because of these events, the media organized a social media page called Latinos en la Prensa, to share information on important topics like preparedness. This month’s PrepareAthon event was held on September 15 at the Greater Tulsa Hispanic Chamber of Commerce.

One limitation for the LCB on outreach is that its steering committee is made up of representatives of multi-cultural organizations, many of whom are unable to help with booths at multi-cultural events because they have their own to staff. Thanks to the involvement of the OKMRC, the LCB is able to use OKMRC volunteers at these events, providing preparedness resources in multiple languages.

To volunteer with the Oklahoma Medical Reserve Corps, go to this link. For more information on the Language & Culture Bank, go to this link.

Posted in Disaster Resistant Business Council | Leave a comment

KOTV News on 6: Lessons of ’86 Arkansas River Flood

If you live in Tulsa County, you need to check out this story. Congratulations to KOTV – The News On 6, Travis Meyer and Mike Grogan on a well documented, easy-to-understand story about our risk of flooding along the Arkansas River. Be sure to also look at the Web extra Flood fly over showing what would be flooded in 100 year, 200 year and 500 year flood events.

NewsOn6.com – Tulsa, OK – News, Weather, Video and Sports – KOTV.com |

NewsOn6.com – Tulsa, OK – News, Weather, Video and Sports – KOTV.com |

Posted in About Us | Leave a comment

SEPTEMBER KEY MESSAGE–NATIONAL PREPAREDNESS MONTH

new-picture
#SeptemberKeyMessage September is National Preparedness Month. Everyone should have an emergency plan in case of flooding or other disasters. This year we are asking you to take action now – make a plan with your community, your family, and for your pets. Plan how to stay safe and communicate during the disasters that can affect your community.

Floods can occur during any season, especially if you live in a low-lying area, along a levee or downstream from a dam. Preparing an emergency plan in case of a flood or other disaster is very important, especially for families. Talk with your family about creating a flood safety plan and disaster supply kit. For tools and tips visit: http://www.ready.gov/kids/know-the-facts/floods. To find out about preparing for earthquakes, tornadoes and other hazards, go to the Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management webpage: https://www.ok.gov/OEM/ .

Creating a disaster supply kit is easy, all you need is a backpack and a few household supplies. Some ideas for what to put in a kit: bottled water, non-perishable food/snacks, first aid kit, all-season clothes and sturdy shoes, flashlights, batteries, extra prescription medicine, a blanket, a NOAA weather radio, pet and baby supplies and any other essentials you will need in case you have to evacuate immediately or are without basic utilities for several days. More information about building disaster supply kits can be found at: http://www.ready.gov/kit or at http://tulsapartners.org/tpi/be-prepared/

To learn more about your risk of flooding and how to be prepared call the City of Tulsa Customer Care Center at (918) 596-2100, or visit: www.floodsmart.gov or https://www.cityoftulsa.org/city-services/flood-control.aspx.
@tulsapartners

Tulsa Partners shares these monthly key messages from the City of Tulsa Program for Public Information as part of the National Flood Insurance Program Community Rating System. Such documented outreach assists our community in keeping low flood insurance rates in Tulsa.

Posted in About Us | Leave a comment

Weekly School Weather Update–September 12, 2016

Posted in About Us | Leave a comment